Category Archives: Uncategorized

Last Chance to Apply for Small Group Mentoring! Deadline is MON 10/22!

I am so excited for the first small group mentoring session to get started! Thank you to everyone who has already applied and enrolled in the first group!

If you are still on the fence about the program, please feel free to reach out!

For more information on the program and how to enroll, click here!

All the best,

Jessica

Movement, Pain Science & Wisdom: Clinical Expert Interview with Shelly Prosko, PT, PYT,CPI, C-IAYT

This afternoon, while my rambunctious little toddler was attempting (and ultimately failing!) a nap, I had the fantastic opportunity to chat with Shelly Prosko, a physiotherapist and yoga therapist in Alberta, Canada who specializes in working with individuals experiencing chronic pain (including pelvic pain!). Shelly is an all-around incredible human, knowledgeable clinician, and dynamic educator. I hope you all enjoy this interview as much as I enjoyed it!

Shelly and I chatted about some of the incredible content she has online, so I wanted to make sure I shared all of that information with you! If you would like to see the full playlist of her Words of Wisdom (W.O.W.) Chats, click here.
The individual links to the W.O.W. Chats we discussed are located below:
Lorimer Moseley: Pain Science Education vs Understanding Pain (I absolutely loved this one!!) 
Dr. Gabor Mate: Compassionate Inquiry for health providers
Carolyn Vandyken: Cultivating Courage for personal growth
Diane Lee: Connecting with Essence: your injury/pain does not define who you truly are
Mike Stewart: Your Pain is Real. We Believe You.
Shelly’s blog on Self-Care and what it really means to her:
Shelly also shared these resources for all of you:
Online course: PhysioYoga and the Pelvic Floor for healthcare providers, movement specialists, fitness professionals, yoga professionals:
Creating Pelvic Floor Health PhysioYoga video practices on Vimeo:
(Shelly has kindly given all of us this 10% off code: ClientDiscount10 for the “Buy All” option)
Shelly’s Pelvic Floor Resources: 

Are you a physical therapist interested in small group mentoring? Help me out by taking a short survey!

It’s almost here! I have been working on developing a small group mentoring program over the past few months, and it is almost ready to be rolled out!

As an instructor for Herman & Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute, I have been fortunate to work with hundreds of excellent clinicians who are at various stages of their journeys into the exciting world of pelvic health. While some clinicians enter into the field with a vast network of seasoned pelvic floor experts to support them, others have the additional challenge of being an “island”–basically, being the sole practitioner in their practice, city, and for some, within a 100+ mi radius.

My goal with small group mentoring is to be a facilitator for those journeying into this incredible specialty–to help not only with building the skill, knowledge and clinical reasoning necessary to create outstanding clinicians, but also to help connect clinicians together so no one has to go at it alone.

If this resonates with you, and you’re interested in learning with me, I would love to hear from you! I created this survey to better assess the needs of those interested in small group mentoring. Please take a few minutes to complete this survey, and look out for future announcements when the program is ready for rolling out!

All the best,

Jessica

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE SURVEY ON SMALL GROUP MENTORING 

What’s it like to learn to treat pelvic floor dysfunction? A Video Interview

I just got back from a fantastic weekend in Wichita, KS teaching (and really learning with!!) an excellent group of participants from across the country. Heather Radar, PT, DPT, BCIA-PMD, PRPC and I worked with these clinicians across 3 days, helping them learn about evaluating and treating constipation, fecal incontinence and other bowel disorders; coccyx pain; and introduced them to the exciting world of male pelvic floor dysfunction.

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Enjoying some Kansas BBQ after our first full day of teaching. This t-shirt was very fitting for a class teaching anorectal examinations. 😉 

Several of my students agreed to be in a short video interview to share about their experiences at the course and some of their big take-aways. I hope you all enjoy this short video! I plan to continue these at future courses both to demystify pelvic floor courses for clinicians out there, and give patients an insight into the training pelvic PTs pursue to become skilled in this specialty.

From left to right, these are the incredible clinicians who volunteered for our interview! If you are needing treatment in any of these areas, please seek these ladies out!

  • Morgan Clark, DPT: www. summitrehabkc.com
  • Hannah Overfelt, DPT: SERC Physical Therapy, Independence MO
  • Nicole DeBrie, PT, DPT: Foundational Concepts, http://www.foundational concepts.net, nicole@foundationalconcepts.net
  • Jennifer Dickinson, PT, DPT: Fitzgibbon Hospital, http://www.fitzgibbon.org
  • Ashley Vollmar, PT, DPT: St. Luke’s of Kansas City, Plaza location
  • Tarryn Andrews, PT, DPT: Accelacare Physical Therapy, http://www.accelacarept.com
  • Marla J. Jacquinot, PT, FAAOMPT: Marla@coreptkc.com
  • Bethany Wellin, PT, DPT: Via Christi Therapy Center, Manhattan KS, http://www.viachristi.org
  • Anne Clark: Wesley Healthcare Outpatient Therapy, Wichita KS, 316-962-9835
  • Caitlyn Tivy, PT, DPT, OCS: Caitlyntivy.wixsite.com/pelvichealthpt

FAQ: Specializing in Pelvic Health as a New Grad

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By Kit from Pittsburgh, USA (Grads Absorb the News) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

I just received this question via e-mail from a participant at my most recent Level 1 Pelvic Floor course in Little Rock, Arkansas. (See upcoming course schedule!) As knowledge and exposure about pelvic floor disorders and pelvic PT grows, we see more and more doctoral students attending level 1 courses. And honestly, it makes me so excited about our future! These students are passionate, hungry for knowledge, and can’t wait to enter into the field and help people get better! I have mentored many students and new grads over the past several years, and this particular question frequently arises. I hope this post can be helpful for many new grads and DPT students in the future!

When students ask the questions listed above, they often are hit with well-intended, but often somewhat discouraging advice:

“You should really do orthopedics for a few years first, and then go into pelvic health.” 

“I really don’t think new grads should go straight into the pelvic health specialty” 

“It’s really important that you use all of your other skills first so you don’t lose them.” 

While this advice often means very well–aiming to create well-rounded practitioners, I find that this can feel very disheartening to that passionate-about-pelvic-health new grad. So, in that light, my advice is often a little bit different. I find we are all biased by our own experience, and in reality, many excellent clinicians spent multiple years in different specialties like orthopedics, neuro, acute care etc. prior to specializing in Pelvic PT, so I think there is a tendency to see this as the “best path” to becoming the most skilled clinician. Of course, I am biased the opposite way– I jumped into pelvic PT immediately upon completing my doctorate, and never looked back. Of course, this has meant that I had to do some work to build upon other skill sets that were needed over the years, but this path worked well for me.

So, why am I telling you all of this, excited-soon-to-be-new-grad? Because, honestly, you can do whatever you are passionate about doing! If you want to take some time to practice in another specialty, do it! If you are just too excited and want to jump right in to pelvic health, welcome aboard! Your experience alone is not going to make you an incredible clinician. Rather, it will be your passion, your hunger for learning, and your dedication to your patients that will fuel your path.  So, on that note, here are a few of my top tips for new grads entering into pelvic health!

  1. Choose an employer who will support your learning journey. In many ways, it has become very popular for clinics to build pelvic health programs. This is wonderful for patients (if they are committed to building good programs!) and a great opportunity for those entering the field. So, when you interview with an employer who is excited about your pelvic floor interest, ask questions to find out how much support they will give you along the way. Will they pay $$$ for your continuing education courses? Will the provide you time to work with a mentor? Will they support you by providing adequate time in your schedule for your patients (meaning, 45-60 dedicated minutes, not overlapping patients)?
  2. Negotiate for what you want. This is very very important. When I was first hired as a new grad, I negotiated with my employer for them to pay for me to attend 4 continuing education courses within my first year of employment. This allowed me to complete a full pelvic health curriculum within the year. Now, I realize that may seem a bit ambitious to some, but I considered this my personal “Residency” program and I felt like it gave me the jump start I wanted! So, this can mean negotiating for courses, mentoring time (get it in writing!), or even participation in an online mentoring program (like the one I plan to set up soon!).
  3. Find a good mentor. Of course, my perfect scenario for you involves finding a good job with a good mentor attached to it, but I realize that is not always easy to find. Reach out to local pelvic PTs in your area and connect with someone who is willing and able to be a resource to you! Of course, this can involve meeting periodically for coffee, or could be a more formal mentoring program. If the latter is the case, see point #2.
  4. Don’t be afraid to jump ship. If you start working somewhere and you don’t find that you are supported in the way you need to be, or you just don’t like the place you are working, it is totally ok for you to find a new job. Seriously. Life is too short to be unhappy where we spend our time.
  5. Be hungry for learning. I would encourage you to make a plan for attending coursework to help build your knowledge within the specialty. There are many excellent course series out there– Herman & Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute, the Section on Women’s Health, Evidence in Motion, among many others. Of course, I teach with H&W, so would love to have you at one of my classes! 🙂 Also, there are so many wonderful opportunities for learning today, outside of traditional continuing education. Read blogs (like this one!). Research conditions and diagnoses that you are not familiar with. Join social media pelvic health groups like Women’s Health Physiotherapy and Global Pelvic Physio (both facebook groups!).  Attend conferences like the Combined Sections Meeting through the APTA, the International Pelvic Pain Society’s Annual Meeting or the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health’s Annual Meeting. And don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it!

I hope that is helpful! We are so fortunate to have so many excited and passionate clinicians joining our field! What other tips do you have for those joining this wonderful specialty? What other question do you have my dear PT students?

~ Jessica

 

Happy New Year!

Can you believe it is 2018?! I find that as the years go by, time seems to pass so much more quickly. 2017 was a year full of so many changes for me–both personally and professionally. I successfully kept a small (and super precious) human alive. I joined the faculty of Herman & Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute and taught 4, 3-day continuing education courses for physical therapists. I cut back on my clinical hours in order to spend more time with the aforementioned small human 😉 and focus on my other professional endeavors. And, I started video content on the blog (although not quite as much as I would have liked).

I am so excited to see what 2018 brings and have so many exciting plans on the horizon, both personally and professionally. I am continuing to work with the Institute teaching continuing education, and would love to see some of you at a future class! I am also actively working on developing new content for this website! This year, I hope to continue diversifying the content you see via written and video blogs and interviews. I am also working to develop both an online mentoring program for clinicians as well as some online program options for those struggling with pelvic floor problems. Keep on the look-out for more information about these programs! If you are interested in either, please be in touch! I would love to hear your thoughts and interests to better develop something you would find worthwhile!

Looking forward to continuing to learn with you and from you in the new year! Thank you as always for your continued support of this endeavor!

Cheers!

Jessica

Biofeedback for Vulvodynia: An Update 

“Do you do Glazer’s protocol?”

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I have been asked this question several times over the past few years, by searching, hopeful women, looking for help after suffering from vulvar pain for far too long. I generally respond with, “I’m familiar with Glazer’s protocol, and would be happy to discuss it with you. Why don’t you come in for an evaluation and we can discuss treatment options specific to you?” This, in place of the, “I know it, but it’s more than likely not appropriate for you.”

Glazer’s protocol was a popular treatment approach, utilizing SEMG biofeedback to teach patients a method of contracting their pelvic floor muscles, to ultimately “fatigue” the muscles, and with the hope that doing so would relieve pain. Dr. Glazer was one of the first to publish research about treating the pelvic floor muscles in helping women with Vulvodynia, and all of us working with men and women with pelvic pain are grateful for his contributions.

However, as time goes on, we learn more and more. Which is awesome. And as we learn more, we hopefully change how we practice to provide the best treatment we can to our patients. Recently, my colleagues Sara Sauder and Amy Stein (2 fantastic clinicians and educators in pelvic pain) wrote an excellent commentary summarizing the evolution of biofeedback in helping women with vulvar pain. I was thrilled to see their commentary, and I thought many of you would benefit from it as well!

Sara and Amy very eloquently explain how the understanding of treatment to the pelvic floor muscles have changed over the years. Glazer’s protocol was based off the idea that frequent contractions of the pelvic floor muscles (both holding contractions and quick ones) would fatigue the muscles and thus lead to relaxation and pain relief. However, our current understanding of the pelvic floor musculature is quite different.

Shortened, Tender Pelvic Floor Muscles 

Amy and Sara go on to explain that as we have learned about the pelvic floor and seen the presentations of women experiencing vulvar pain, we have found that most women actually present with shortened, tender pelvic floor muscles. Typically, when this is found on examination, the optimal treatment includes a combination of relaxation strategies as well as manual treatment vaginally to encourage lengthening of the pelvic floor muscles. And what about fatiguing them by doing lots of kegels? Well, we have found that when shortened muscles do lots of contractions, they can actually get irritated and more shortened!

So, what’s the place for biofeedback? 

First, it is important to realize that the term “biofeedback” is not exclusive to EMG. Really, biofeedback can be any cueing to encourage a patient to perform an exercise accurately. Sara and Amy give a few great examples: a finger in the vagina to encourage and cue the patient to relax and lengthen their muscles. A clinician teaching a patient the optimal way to harness the diaphragm with breathing. All biofeedback. And what about SEMG? It can offer some help for some patients to learn to relax and let go of their muscles. However, it can also be a little tricky because women with shortened muscles may appear “normal” on SEMG. Why? It’s complicated, but in summary, SEMG reads electrical activity… so, when a muscle is held at a shortened position for a long period of time, the body will adjust to this position as the new normal. Thus, this can “trick” a patient or clinician (especially if SEMG is done to replace an internal examination) into thinking the muscles are relaxed and functioning well, when they are actually shortened.

In summary, Glazer was a pioneer who really helped us in the process of better understanding Vulvodynia. But as all treatments and understandings do, we have evolved and changed to better understand what the most effective treatment techniques are for women experiencing Vulvodynia. Biofeedback should be a part of any treatment program… but SEMG biofeedback will have some utility for specific populations and limited utility for others.

I would encourage you to read Sara and Amy’s commentary yourself! You can find it here. If you are a physical therapist treating this population, you have the opportunity to learn from Sara in person! She teaches via Alcove Education, and has an excellent course: Vestibulodynia: An Orthopedic and Pelvic Floor Approach. My clinic is fortunate to host this course in just a few weeks! (Our course is sold out… but you can find upcoming courses here).

Sara and Amy are excellent clinicians, educators and advocates for men and women with pelvic pain. Sara runs a wonderful blog, Blog About Pelvic Pain, and Amy has created fantastic self-help tools, including her book Heal Pelvic Pain and her instructional DVD, Healing Pelvic and Abdominal Pain. I hope you enjoy these resources! 

Have a wonderful week!

Jessica

I’m back! And I have a really really cute baby!

Ok, I know you must be totally shocked to hear from me! But, I am back! For real!

My beautiful daughter, Emma Caroline, was born on October 26th at 1:32 pm, weighing 7 lbs 14 oz and 23 inches long. In case you are super observant, yes, the little girl who threatened to come early actually ended up coming a week late! We delivered her via c-section after 37 hours of labor. Yes, 37. I’m hoping her dramatic streak ends here. I’ll spare you the details now, but I’m sure some will come out along the way as they fit with future posts!

I was so fortunate to spend 12 weeks at home with my little girl, but I am back in the clinic seeing patients now, and back to writing! In fact, I promise you’ll get another post (a real, hopefully educational one!) before the week is through!

2017 is going to be a great year! I have some exciting things planned for the blog (hoping to finally start some fun video posts, more book reviews, and some interviews with colleagues who are super smart!), and I am SO excited to start teaching for Herman and Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute and continue teaching online webinars! See my “for professionals” section for current course listings! I would love to meet you in-person!

Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy 2017!

Jessica

My sweet little Emma, visiting her mama on my first day back at work!

An Update

Hello my friends, colleagues and blog readers! I know what you’re thinking… a post from Jessica? We haven’t heard from you in ages. And you’re right, you haven’t. And I’m sorry. There have been quite a few things going on, and I wanted to fill you in so you would understand why I’ve been a little MIA.

As most of you know, I am currently pregnant, expecting an adorable, sweet baby girl in October! My pregnancy has been wonderful overall, and it has been incredible to be on the “other side” of learning about pregnancy. Unfortunately, a few weeks ago, I began experiencing regular contractions, which ultimately resulted in a short hospital stay, and being placed on modified bedrest. (Now I know what you’re thinking… isn’t bedrest really bad and no longer recommended? It’s modified…meaning, I can move around, etc…but they don’t really want me working as high levels of activity are causing me to contract more, and my little girl needs to cook for a bit longer). This all happened the same exact day I was supposed to give my live webinar on pregnancy (Ha!). Thankfully, Andrew and Karl with Therapy Network Seminars were very understanding, and we canceled the webinar, ultimately rescheduling for next Wednesday, September 14th! So, if you missed it the first time, there is still time to sign up! And I would love to have you on the webinar!

So, back to my current situation… the initial plan was to keep me at home for a few weeks, allow the contractions to slow down, then return to work. Well, unfortunately, my little daughter has other plans for us. So, long story short, I will be out of the clinic until after my daughter is born to give her the best opportunity to grow and develop safely. I do plan to write a few more blogs for you between now and her arrival, but honestly, haven’t been too motivated to do so over the previous few weeks (I think my little mommy nesting brain was so focused on making sure everything was ready for her, should she arrive earlier than we expected!).

My husband and I truly appreciate all of the love, support, meals and prayers that we have received over this time! We are grateful that our sweet daughter is staying put for now, and seems to be healthy, happy and content (I like to think she is completely oblivious to what is happening in the uterus around her!). For those current and prospective patients, I will be scheduling patients again in early January. I plan to keep this information updated on my contact page.

Thank you for your understanding and support! I look forward to continuing this learning and growing journey with you in the future!

~ Jessica

Upcoming Webinar (RESCHEDULED): Management of Musculoskeletal Pain During Pregnancy

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“Management of Musculoskeletal Pain During Pregnancy” 

LIVE Webinar, Wednesday September 14th, 8-9:30 p.m. EST 

I am thrilled to be partnering again with Therapy Network Seminars to present this live webinar providing participants with an introduction to the management of musculoskeletal pain during pregnancy!

So often, clinicians feel ill-equipped and lacking in knowledge to provide quality treatment to women during this important stage of life. Often, clinicians are fearful of complications or precautions their patients may face, or may not know how to modify examination procedures or exercises to accommodate a woman who is pregnant. I hope that this webinar will help more clinicians feel confident in helping their pregnant clients, and inspire many to help reach a population who so very much needs our help!

I hope you’ll join me on Wednesday September 14th for this live 90-minute webinar! Registration is available via Therapy Network Seminars! Let me know if you have any questions and I hope to see you there!!

NOTE: This webinar was rescheduled from the original date of August 18th. If you can’t make this webinar, or would like to listen to some previous webinars, they are available on-demand! Check out the topics available here